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for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
-fire that starts at 11 a.m. sharp. >> reporter: right now is hour time, 9:30 p.m. in cairo where the agreement was reached about 90 minutes ago. we want to take you live to jerusalem to israel this is israeli president benjamin netanyahu. he has confirmed the truce this morning he's speaking live. he says he agreed after consulting with president obama. you see him wrapping up his remarks now. also we want to show you this video, secretary of state clinton in cairo. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza the rocket attacks must end a calm returns. the people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence, today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> reporter: just a few hours ago the violence was escalating. israel launched rapid fire airstrikes on gaza city after a small militant group set off a bomb on a bus full of civilians in tel aviv, 27 people were hurt. the cease-fire reached just now, beginning just now, includes that after 24 hours of quiet gaza's border crossings with israel will be open. over t
with its own people. [chanting] just ahead protests in the streets of cairo and why the egyptian president ♪ backing down. what of the israeli truce? plus the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice took some heat over her comments on the libya consulate attack. now it looks like though her critics have some ammunition against their claims. now she is going to go speak to some of them on capitol hill. benghazi and susan rice and is the tide turning? that's coming up from the journalists of fox news on this monday fox report. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
forced from power from popular revolt. joining me is reza. in cairo. and we also have a senior fellow here in new york. the egyptian prime minister met with hamas today and he classified hamas as a terrorist organization. should washington be concerned about israel's role in the conflict. >> reporter: anderson, it's impossible to say what egypt's role is at this point. it is not clear at this point if the fiery rhetoric is just rhetoric or if there's something beyond that or prepare for example more drastic measures. i think we'll find out in the days and weeks to come, but people in washington are listening to this explosive rhetoric and they are concerned, but if you look carefully there's not much happening beyond the rhetoric. i don't think egypt can describe this and viewed as extreme, belligerent departure from the past and they certainly haven't taken arms against israel will and providing material support to hamas and they've come out and said loud and clear that we're going to abide by the camp david accords, the peace accords between camp david and israel and these are all e
may happen next. now, from cairo. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against the egyptian president, mohamed morsy, not the big numbers we saw on friday. but certainly, still a lot of people out here, about 30 tents here, this is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it is not clear how long they will stay here. but when you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsy's controversial decrees. he is saying that nobody can revise what i say. he is actually throwing the whole system out, totally. >> reporter: meanwhile, big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences, where factions opposed mr. morsy's moves to put pressure on the system. it seemed to weaken the judiciary, by calling for a nationwide judge's strike. also the supreme judicial committee, discussed the attack on the judiciary. they called for a one-million protest and sit-in for tuesday. what does mr. morsy's group do? they call for a one-million man protest, as well on tuesday. some critical days ahead. cairo. >>> elsewhere in the region, the signs the truce
the professor can speak in free times from cairo now is an indication that freedom of speech is still very much alive in egypt and also an indication that mubarak is no longer in power and you know, morsi is dependent on the u.s. for aid. dependent on the imf. international opinion will not allow for mubarak, for morsi to consolidate power around him. >> you said mubarak. >> freudian slip. >> what do you think about that? is morsi a long away way from being an islamist dictatdictato? >> in terms of expression, i could speak to you three and four years ago from cairo and freely as i have done just right now and i did speak several times. criticizing measures and policies took and put forward by the president and his government. so in terms of freedom of expression, it's not a huge leap, but let me remind you as well of the fact that at least one chairman was closed in the last weeks in a step which we considered egypt to be negatively imposing a democratic limit on tv channels. however, if we sustain checks and balances, in the moments in which do not have a branch of government, and morsi is th
. >> nbc's stephanie gosk is in tel aviv, ayman mohyeldin in gaza, jim maceda in cairo. let's ask jim maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demand
and hamas. the head of hamas is now making a statement in cairo. want to play that for you. >> translator: god took their hand off gaza and can build them to commit themselves to the conditions of the resistance. therefore, if we understand, this simplicity, we can understand as people of the media to tell the brave message of our people to the entire world, because we want the entire world to understand our people and our cause. and through you, we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt and their attempts back fired against them. they wanted to destroy the infrastructure of the resistance in hamas. today, they claim they have done so, and they have not. this is -- they are bankrupt. i don't deny they have done so much, we could count how many buildings they have destroyed. and how many offices of the media they have destroyed and how many children they have kill ed. and how many journalists and how many photographers they have killed, just like you. we can count how many offices and how many buildings they have destroy
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
. an israeli official reportedly just landed in cairo, where egypt is trying to broke are a cease-fire. as israel signals it is open to negotiation, it is also preparing for the possibility of a ground war. we have team coverage. we have a reporter on the ground and a reporter traveling with president obottom akeeping a close eye on the middle-east. leyland? >> reporter: shannon, this is a country on the brink of war, just over my right shoulder is the gas station, where many citizens soldier some of the 30,000 reservivist, called up, stopping for everything from oreos to water to do rito's to pick up before they man their tank, maneuvering in the black of this, right behind me, before possibly heading into gazzasm more than a dozen palestinian killed in airstrikes inside the gaza strip. many of them are civilian, some children. here, we have had at least a dozen injured. this is quite literally the tip of the israeli spear. these are citizen shoaleddiers, a lot of them engineers or accountants, drafted into service here. they are getting their tanks ready, all along the gaza bord
dem strierts near downtown cairo. security forces have been clashing with protester who's are angry with the lathes decree from hamid morsi. morsi giving himself almost ax slut power dosuspending judicia review of any decision he makes bringing instability to the fragile middle east. welcome to america's news headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree tha
, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, secularists, moderates. all have banded together in a show of force, in a show of opposition, agains
to address the nation. before that atresz, more violence today in the streets of cairo. protesters demanding president morsi rescind his decree once again clashing with police. there are calms for giant protests coming up for tomorrow as well as saturday. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel joins us live from cairo with more on this. president morsi, richard, is expected to address the nation at the top of the hour. do we have any information about what he's going to say basically trying to calm the crowds that are expected to protest? >> reporter: yeah. i think what he's going to say, however, is not going to calm these crowds. it is only going to make them more angry. he's probably going to set a date for a referendum on the constitution. as you said, a week ago today, president morsi gave himself extraordinary powers. he made himself more powerful than any previous egyptian presidents. more powerful than the kings of egypt, in fact. he said that his word was law. that in decree that he issued could not be overturned by the supreme court, by any court in this land. his word
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
to talk about. the middle east will be a hot topic. this is what it looked like over in cairo over the weekend while you were with your family probably not paying too much attention to the news. but, boy, things are unfolding there in a major way with thousands of angry demonstrators calling president morsi, the new pharaoh and raising questions about our relationship with what was once a critical ally in the region. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo where we've been watching the crowds get bigger and bigger in tahrir square. steve? >> reporter: megyn, it looks like president morsi is trying to give the appearance trying to find a way out of the situation, some sort of compromise from the firestorm he set off four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are positive the law, not subject to being evoked by egyptian courts. he is meeting with chief justices in cairo looking for some sort of compromise solution, perhaps limiting that decree but the big question whether any limits or talk of compromise will be enough for people that have come out on the stree
in egypt. we have been watching crowds of protestors grow bigger all day in the heart of cairo where people are increasingly angry about a move by egypt's president tow grand himself sweeping new powers. he says his decree is only them appraiser raoerbg temporary, allows him to ignore the courts. he says it's in the best interest of his country. the egyptians are not sure. joining me is a strategic analyst. he says i don't have to listen to anybody, i'm the president i have to get this country in order. there you have it. what do you make of today and the protests we're seeing? >> the protests we're seeing, we'll have to wait and see what the estimates are for the crowd size, but they are absolutely critical, because a counter revolution has set in and iffy egyptians want to rescue democracy, and -- have a constitution to treat all citizens equally the forces of liberalism, of secularism of moderation need to win this one. the fate of egypt really is on the line, because if morsi is able to weather this demonstration he will be able to push in islam influence, sharia law constitution. when
january. that development comes as delegations for both israel and hamas meet in cairo today. they're meeting with egyptian officials to try to advance those cease-fire talks. and egypt's president mohamed morsi will meet today with judges to explain his edict barring them from overturning any decision that he makes or any laws that he imposes until a new parliament is formed. reza sayah is in cairo this morning. let's start with mohamed morsi, please. >> yeah, good morning, soledad. a few thousand protesters still here in south tahrir squares, especially those who camped out over the past several days, still seeing some clashes. most of them triggered by what seem to be teenagers and twenty somethings out here looking for trouble. we also saw our first fatality of the protest last night on sunday in a northern city where a 15-year-old member of the muslim brotherhood youth movement was clubbed to death. at this point the brotherhood doesn't seem to be using that fatality as a rallying cry to shore up support. but at the same time, it doesn't seem to be any indication that this con
. >>> tear gas in cairo near the u.s. embassy as the fight for democracy goes on. >> face to face. susan rice and john mccain, the man who wanted watergate style hearings, meet. and only cnn catches up with mccain before the big meeting. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> wouldn't you like to be a fly on the wall? >>> spyfall, real-life bond movie. yasser arafat's body was exhumed. was the palestinian leader po h poisoned by israeli spies? >>> plus this. >> you said walden is in trouble. >> i'm the trouble walden has been in, repeatedly. >> he calls it filth, the half in "two and a half men" begs you not to watch his show. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin with a high stakes meeting just minutes from now. this hour, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you
plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on by a panel dominated by president's morsi's political allies, neither all of them islamists. the constitution gives islamic sharia law a more specific role in government and doesn't guarantee women's equality. it also empowers the state to defend morals and values. critics like human rights lawyer say that could
in cairo and the video as opposed to, no, this was a terrorist attack. my take away was that, you know, their initial reaction was it was a response to what was going on in cairo but there may have been also other elements of terrorism there and from there it went to secretary rice who seemed to focus just on the video rather than saying it was a lot of different things. so i'm kind of in the middle on this in my dissection. i do think petraeus did say that there's a lot of things that play here but once he released that to the administration, they chose to focus primarily on the video and not so much on the other elements. i really don't know why they did that. it doesn't really make sense to me. but that's pretty much how today went. >> sir, if senator john mccain has called for a watergate style investigation into the attack, basically asking for a select committee coming out earlier this week with senators to say they aren't going to get enough information through what we're seeing in the testimony of petraeus and thinks there is an under current here of something else. do you agre
. israel denies losing any aircraft. egypt is trying to stop this war before it is too late. cairo's intelligence chief is spearheading talks to end the violence. but on the border, peace looks like an unlikely prospect. our senior international correspondent, ben wedeman joins us now between the border between israel and gaza. ben, ground war, are we about to witness that? >> reporter: i don't think immediately, don. i think there's still time needed to get the israeli military ready for a ground invasion. keep in mind that gaza is an area just twice the size of washington, d.c., with a population of 1.5 million people. any military force that goes in there has got to contend with the possibility of a lot of civilian casualties and a fair amount of resistance, from hamas fighters. now, what we're seeing here on the border are intense preparations, all night long. we've been watching as big trucks carrying tanks, carrying armored personnel carriers have been going up and down the road. a lot of soldiers in this area. the israeli government has yet to say when or if they would final
prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he stands there at the boarder? >> i think there's an element of that. i think the first thing is the fact that the rockets, especially the rockets that have a range of about 45 to 46 miles and that can come close to even tel aviv, that that is the immediate catalyst for this operation, but there's no doubt that prime minister netanyahu see some political utility in showing a hard line to protect israel's natio
me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel a
in the last couple of years. he has not achieved the breakthroughs that he wanted when he went to cairo in 2009. and while many on his team have abandoned the playing field, mitchell, dennis ross, this is a unique opportunity for him to reinvigorate his middle east leadership and bring a new team in with new ideas and strategies to resurrect the commitments he made in cairo which is essential to u.s. long-term interest. >> the other relationship is the one between the president and prime minister -- mr. netanyahu, who actually praised the president's diplomatic efforts within this. he's got an election coming up. it's been something of a rocky relationship, if you will. how does this -- the president's involvement strengthen his relationship with netanyahu going forward? >> there's been all this criticism of this relationship, the dysfunctionalty over political issues, negotiations. one thing that's quite clear to me in watching the president very carefully, after the election, he didn't need the jewish vote in florida or new york, and yet he stood up to the plate, he had his reels back
but they will he can press a complaint with cairo, the government that sponsored this truce and they will record their complaint that a violation has happened. alex? >> has this done anything to quell all the celebrations that were going on there in gaza? >> reporter: well, there were celebrations all throughout the day on thursday. yesterday hamas declared it a victory. the palestinian factions held military parade. there weren't many rallies expected today though it is friday prayers here. a lot of mosques throughout the territory did celebrate the victory that occurred as a result of the eight days of fighting. but right now there are no celebrations taking place or rallies though the mood here is relatively calm. people are going about their business as usual despite this violation. alex? >> all right, ayman, many thanks from that. to gaza to israel and tel aviv. special correspondent martin fletcher is joining us. martin, with a good friday to you. let's talk about what israeli forces have done having announced they've made several arrests in wednesday's bus bombing there in tel aviv. what'
. >> we know they are ongoing. israeli radio is saying an envoy was sent to cairo today. that person will meet up with envoys from the palestinian side, as well as representatives from qatar and egypt that will work on negotiating a cease fire. today you had prime minister netanyahu say as long as the rockets are landing in israel there will be no cease fire. his defense minister ehud barak said he expects the possibility of this conflict widening. that's a suggestion there could be some ground invasion in gaza at the very least. as you know, there are troops amassing in in the south of israel preparing for that ground invasion. although so far it seems like talks are ongoing ander in a period of trying to figure out if they can maintain a cease fire so the troops don't have to go in. >> it is a tense time is an under statement there. how long will these talks go underway? do you know? is there an outside that israel has indicated they will allow for them to try to negotiate and bargain before they may do military action? >> well, we did hear from the foreign minister in israel who s
and the pro democracy demonstrators led to one death and hundred credits of injuries. and now to cairo, what happened with the meeting with the judges today with president morsi? >>reporter: details still coming out but this was supposed to be a dave compromise when the egyptian president reached out to opponents, some of the chief judge whose have opposed his move to put himself above the law and the courts and make a compromise on that decree, perhaps modify it. initial reports say there was no back down by the president, insteads saying he stands firm on his right to impose that decree and any laws he issues are final and above the law. really, you can hear it filter into the crowd. they are getting news of this and the anger and energy of the crowd has risen in the past hour. >>shepard: and they will not back down unless and until president morsi rescinds the decrees. >>reporter: that is right. they are looking for complete withdrawal of the decree by the president. there is a major demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. in was supposed to be competing demonstrations, with backers of the
tension in the middle east. this is cairo, egypt. this is the scene in tahrir square and almost nightfall. look at the crowd that has gathered after lawmakers approve a new constitution threatening to inflame already tense situation between the opposition and the heart-line government. steve hair gan streaming -- harrigan, streaming live in cairo, egypt the constitution already written. coming under sharp criticism. what do we know about it, steve? >> reporter: it is being criticized by opponents of this government. first of all people say it is a rush job. they basically pulled an all-nighter last night to write a constitution. 16 hours of debate. finally getting it through. there is real concerns about the role of islamic law in the new constitution. concerns about the protection of women's rights in this constitution. basically this is document written by the muslim brotherhood because all liberal members of this assembly walked out long ago, bill. bill: is there a chance that will diffuse the protests we have seen so far, steve? >> reporter: the hopes were on the president's side that
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
referred to demonstrations in benghazi growing out of what happened in cairo with the movie. how was the cia, how are our intelligence agencies so incredibly wrong about this? i mean it was not just rice. regarding her confirmation, i can tell you that she probably almost certainly wins confirmation if the white house goes forward with this, and the white house is signaling clearly that that is where the president is heading right now. whether or not he goes through it or not, but democrats, i'd be interested to hear what you say about this, but what i'm hearing democrats from the senate, don't necessarily want this fight right now because it will be three weeks of battles over the rice nomination focusing on benghazi because it will be filibustered. not all republicans will go along with its. the filibuster will not be successful but this will be a bat many that lasts three weeks. >> martha, secretary -- ambassador rice communicated what she had been given to communicate by the intelligence community. senator mccain and senator graham's beef is with the intelligence community, n
of people. meanwhile, egypt and president hoe ma'am head morsi says discussions are under way in cairo and arab league foreign ministers will visit on tuesday. >>> after a marathon stay in space, williams handed over command of the international space station yesterday after the calling it home for the last four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya
, by the time it was getting ready to announce it in cairo, there was a great sense of anxiety that, in fact, the truce slipped out of the party's reach because we woke up on tuesday morning, yesterday morning, with a great sense of optimism there will be a cease-fire. by last night, it looked like it was out of reach and a great sense of desperation this morning. in fact, almost a spike of overnight killings. the death toll 146. 34 in one day's count and people this morning were waking up to very different feelings than they were yesterday. soldiers on the border. people very much afraid of a ground invasion. perhaps it was thedy ploy sy of secretary clinton to salvage this. they're not out of woods to use that expression but no sense that this evening will be a lot or at least relatively calmer than it was over the past eight nights. >> coming to the cease-fire and the agreement that was made, what are the conditions that hamas was willing to bring to the table to negotiate with? >> reporter: well, hamas is willing -- hamas and the palestinian factions part of it willing to stop all rocket
reporting from the front lines. protesters took to the streets of cairo today after mohamed morsi basically stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping presidential powers and eliminate the judiciary. demonstrators called on morsi to roll back his decree or resign. at least one person died in clashes with police. demonstrators stormed the headquarters of a party backed by morsi's muslim brotherhood. a spokesman said the building was destroyed, dozens of injuries. >>> 213-foot crane caught fire, it partially collapsed. this was on to a university building in sidney today. the crane was carrying 264 gallons of diesel fuel, flames went 32 feet into the air. no one was injured according to the operator lend lease. i wanted to mention that name because it might sound familiar. it is the same company that operated the crane that partially collapsed in new york city during superstorm sandy. the company is still in the process of reviewing that incident. >>> well, for the first time since his arrest two years ago, bradley manning is expected to take the stand in a pretrial hearing this week. no
and they are not good for americans. the u.s. embassy in cairo has been closed. protesters are blocking the entrance, and the clashes are happening very, very close by. there is no indication at this time, however, that our embassy there is threatened. stay tuned. we'll keep you posted to the developments in that country. >>> and also in the middle east, we are seeing a rare moment of cooperation today between the palestinian authority and hamas. it's coming thousands of miles away from where they usually live. they're in new york, and both sides want their united nations status elevated. what does that mean? does it really do anything for them? basically, it's part of the palestinian effort, going on for decades now, to be an official country. equal in status with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.
needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted
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